11/22/2014

explaining the electrocal (electric electoral) shocks and waves in the US lately

"There is one finding that can well explain the unusual volatility and disaffection of so many American voters over the last decade. In 2000, 16 percent of households were headed by people without high school diplomas, and another 51 percent were headed by people without college degrees. From 2002 to 2012, the median income of the first group, across age cohorts, declined at an average annual rate of 2.4 percent, year after year; and the median income of the second group, across age cohorts fell at an average annual rate of 1 percent, year after year. That tells us that two-thirds of American households have suffered persistent income losses as they aged from 2002 to 2012, through eight years of economic expansion along with two years of serious recession. The median income of the remaining households, headed by college graduates, increased over this period—but at only one-third of the rate of households headed by college graduates in the 1980s and 1990s.

 

These trends have enormous electoral consequences. They explain why, in recent years, overall positive economic numbers and growth are not translating into feelings of shared prosperity. That’s why so many Americans are angry and ready to turn on whichever party has most recently failed to restore the broad income progress that almost everyone experienced in the 1980s and 1990s.
http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/fixgov/posts/2014/11/18-ec...

and this is what will happen in Belgium as we going through a wave of protests and afterwards huge reductions in wages, pensions, subsidies and available income

the same thing can be seen since 2007 in other countries and recently in France

Economists and investors are talking about growth and invesments and returns but the people who do the work don't see much of it, on the contrary

Permalink | |  Print |  Facebook | | | | Pin it! |

The comments are closed.