12/16/2014

attack on pipeline is 6 years later attributed to cyberattack

"Yesterday, Bloomberg News reported that hackers, likely from Russia, caused a 2008 explosion on the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (BTC) oil pipeline in Turkey. According to Bloomberg, the BTC pipeline attack “Opened [a] New Cyberwar Era,” two years before the Stuxnet worm derailed Iranian nuclear centrifuges. The report is significant because it moves back the timeline for alleged state-sponsored cyber attacks that caused destruction in the physical world. (I use “attack” throughout this post in the colloquial sense, without reference to whether an “attack” is an “armed attack” for purposes of international law.)

 

But the pipeline explosion report also highlights another important issue. It took six years for the explosion to be publicly revealed as a cyber attack, and confusion about whether an incident is an accident or a cyber attack may be a common problem going forward. Although lot of attention focuses on cybersecurity attribution as a question of who carried out an intrusion, the BTC explosion exemplifies an analytically prior attribution question: what caused an incident, a cyber attack or a simple malfunction?http://justsecurity.org/18334/cyber-attribution-problems-...

and so if people get the right to respond immediately to such a cyberattack, the chance that they will be responding to the wrong country and are falling into a second trap is much bigger than anybody realises

in the US there is even talk of responding with military attacks

Permalink | |  Print |  Facebook | | | | Pin it! |

The comments are closed.